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Topics - Willem

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31
We took some photos of everybody here at rewild.info, and photoshopped them. We really want you to read the Disobedience of the Daughter of the Sun! Ignore some of the books folks have in their hands in the pictures...we ran out of copies  of Disobedience.











And of course, Martin himself says it best:


"Read my book, Godesky!"



32
Social Technology / The Elements of Storyjamming
« on: March 16, 2008, 04:58:10 PM »
I thought I'd post some thoughts on technique, then it turned into something worthy of a blog-post.

http://www.mythic-cartography.org/2008/03/16/the-elements-of-storyjamming/

Just the tip of the iceberg, but you have to start somewhere, eh?

33
This topic has been moved to the Humanure Bucket, because rewilders honestly do not care about the beautiful and exciting ways in which nanotechnology will enrich our lives.

http://www.rewild.info/conversations/index.php?topic=791.0

34
Social Technology / Story Games and resuscitating home grown Story!
« on: March 10, 2008, 09:35:12 PM »
So timeless has asked me to talk about some experimentation I've done lately with 'story games', also known as role playing games. Jason really inspired me to try this out and give 'story gaming' a chance. Also Urban Scout really pushed for it as he wanted something to do this winter indoors. :) So thanks guys for pressing the experiment. Though it didn't work the way I planned, it has definitely produced fruit.

These role-playing games, aka 'rpgs', have come a long way since the days of Dungeons and Dragons, and the 'kill monsters and steal their stuff' story repeated ad nauseum (now in an updated electronic venue near you, in countless variations).

I've noticed a lack of storytelling tradition in my social circle, and in my life, and yet I know everyone wants it! We want to stop consuming mass media entertainment, and yet many of us end up going back because we don't know how to tell new stories that satisfy as much as what we see on the TV and in the movie theater.

Pretty pathetic really, but not our fault; we live on story. And we can't just steal stories out of a "Tales of Indian Folklore" book, because not only do they not belong to vast majority of us, they mostly don't speak to our own heritage, struggles, and situation. We need new stories to speak to the struggles of rewilding in this place, in this time.

SO! Story games, relying on each other's support to create new stories together, to collaborate, to form story groups in the exact same way musicians form bands, and jam together. Then the issues become ones of trust, willingness to listen and respond, making each other sound *good*, and one-mindedness that comes from all of that. Rather than a rock band, we form a Story Band.

The story game ends up becoming the musical 'rules' (the scales, the rhythm, etc.) for our participation, and our own voices, and creativity our instrument.

Now this all sounds great, but trying to learn these collaborative 'story games' without coaching or support really exhausted and challenged me, along with most of the players.

And so my first several attempts at these games I would definitely say I did not have fun per se, but I kept going because I knew something lay at the end of the tunnel.

And then three of us got together, with just the right game, and cracked it! We really jammed and had a good time.

Now we get into nitty-gritty details, as timeless requested. So for those of you not familiar with the world of indie games, as timeless does, I might lose you a bit here. But timeless wants to know details! In the next post I'll talk about specific conclusions.

EDIT: The paraphrase for all this yapping, as I posted on my blog, "So I’ve spent a long time trying to develop a culture of storytelling amongst friends, students, family, and so on. Recently I’ve stumbled across a whole little movement, the world of small press and independently published, owner-created role-playing games. I blame Jason Godesky."

35
Common Misconceptions / 'The Rewilding Project'
« on: February 29, 2008, 12:43:06 PM »
Dood. Weeeeeeeeeeird. Check it out: http://www.sweetliberty.org/issues/rewilding/


36
Common Misconceptions / MOVED: Re: noble savage
« on: February 07, 2008, 12:40:08 PM »

37
Rewilding Mind & Heart / MOVED: Re: Beyond tribalism
« on: February 07, 2008, 12:38:05 PM »
This topic has been moved to the Humanure Bucket.

http://www.rewild.info/conversations/index.php?topic=735.0

38
This topic has been moved to the Humanure Bucket.


39
The Humanure Bucket / Read here at your own risk
« on: February 06, 2008, 02:31:44 PM »
I've created this topic to sequester inappropriate posts that don't fit the rewilding theme that well.

You may find cruel, offensive, off-color, and otherwise generally unpleasant posts here. You may also find relatively innocent but poorly matched subject matter.

Read them at your own risk.

40
Social Technology / Dumbing Down Dunbar's Number
« on: January 25, 2008, 03:26:12 PM »
Not to toot my own horn (alright, toot toot, why hide it), but I just totally had a personal breakthrough on Dunbar's Number, the conception of a mean maximum for meaningful and high-functioning human social networks.

Check it out, yo:

http://www.mythic-cartography.org/2008/01/25/dumbing-down-dunbars-number/

If you want, you can post any reactions here. I almost don't get any comments on my blog anyway. Sigh.

41
Music, Art & Creativity / The Rewild Adventure Guide
« on: January 18, 2008, 03:26:29 PM »
So some of you may know that I've begun working on my personal vision of rewilding in book form.

I've started posting draft excerpts on my blog and would love to hear feedback. This feedback will help create the final version of the book.

I've got a cool illustrator and everything, too! Very exciting.

My most recent excerpt:

http://www.mythic-cartography.org/2008/01/18/riddles-in-the-rewild-guide/

42
Language & Oral Tradition / Queer Language and E-Primitive
« on: January 05, 2008, 10:55:31 AM »
For the awesome queer rewilders on the board, thanks for making this place that much better!

I've got a question for any of y'all who have an answer.

I've known for a while that genderless third person pronouns exist (alternatives to he, she, it, his hers, its, etc.), developed to rehabilitate the English bias. I don't know them off hand, I don't even know if more than one set exists. Please fill me in if anybody knows about this!

Also, I wonder what other queer languaging exists to de-fang the soul-eating bite of English. I've realized recently that these kinds of things express vital parts of E-primitive, and it really got me excited to realize folks started this work long before today, without any notion of rewilding or collapse.

43
Social Technology / Teamwork, and "Where does your body end?"
« on: December 22, 2007, 01:15:35 PM »
For various reasons I got to thinking about high-performing teams in the modern age, and our heritage as tribalists/extended-family-ists.

Though I work away and improving my team-building skills, I know that in all actuality, creating/synthesizing a team comes down to a pretty simple set of pressures and experiences.

Crisis creates a team, and the deeper the crisis, the more powerful the team.

Highly team-based organizations like Hotshots and Special Forces folks know this. You just grind away at the members of the team till they don't know where their body ends and the other team members begin.

You can see this sometimes, in teams of folks who, when apart, have a kind of half-life...like an arm that has gone off and taken a job as a desk clerk while the rest of its body continues on as a garbageman, or something.

In a funny way, the team building social-technologies I use will never hold a candle to the fundamental experrience of a simple, powerful, life-threatening crisis.

I keep having images of men in my mind's eye as I write this, so this may not apply to women (of our culture).

In any case, this 'team' notion, of not knowing where your body ends and the team begins, sounds a lot like a step towards animism, eh?

44
Alright, my new favorite book:

"On Talking Terms with Dogs: Calming Signals" by Turid Rugaas

A brilliant book that left me unable to look at dogs the same ever again. Ever. I could tell you some stories from the aftereffects, wow!

But in any case, a really good quote, that Mr. Godesky would appreciate in particular, but all y'all will enjoy hearing:

Quote from: Turid Rugaas
For many years it has been a myth that you have to take a leadership position to prevent a puppy from trying to take over and to be the boss. Many sad dog destinies and many problems have come out of that myth and it is not the way it works.

Stop using the word leadership, and use instead the word parenthood, as this is exactly what it should be.

A wolf pack is created by a pair of wolves who have cubs. The cubs grow up with the most patient and loving parents anyone can wish for, and in return they will love and have a natural respect for their parents lasting their whole lives. They are fed first, before the adults even think about eating, and they grow up in a world of love, safety and care.

When they get old enough, some of them will leave to make their own little family. Others stay with their parents, helping to bring up their own little family. Others stay with their parents, helping to bring up the new cubs, and hunt together with them. They never try to "take over" or anything like that as the natural respect lasts a lifetime.

This book really touched my heart as a new way of seeing and relating to dogs, and the implications for rewilding in terms of body language and what wolves have taught us about relating (and why several native cultures I can think of off hand claim we learned how to behave like family from wolves).




45
**READ HERE FIRST** / We just passed the 200 member mark! Woohoo!
« on: October 16, 2007, 10:55:59 AM »
Take THAT, civilization!

:)


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